THE GOLDEN COCKEREL & OTHER WRITINGS

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THE GOLDEN COCKEREL & OTHER WRITINGS, BY JUAN RULFO, TRANSLATED BY DOUGLAS J. WEATHERFORD

Expertly translated by Douglas J. Weatherford, who includes a helpful, historical introduction grounding what is an intentionally ungrounded novel, The Golden Cockerel is accompanied by a smattering of shorter texts—fragments of screenplays, novels, travel narratives, letters and notebooks that paint a fuller picture of Rulfo the writer, chosen in close consultation with Víctor Jiménez, director of the Fundación Juan Rulfo, and members of the Rulfo family.

Rulfo’s lesser known second novel does not disappoint. Though less polished and composed of longer sentences than his other work, it can be equally bleak and often, as spare. It is perhaps revealing that an early title for the novel was De la nada a la nada (From Nothing to Nothing). Coffins mark major plot points.

None of Rulfo’s hardscrabble characters are let off the hook here. Not Dionisio Pinzón, rags to riches cockfighter and gambler who falls victim to his greed and ultimately loses it all in one final fever dream of Paco, one of the many mid-century games of chance popular in the rural townships the novel explores. His wife, Bernarda Cutiño, fares no better. A tramposa and roving singer, she succumbs to alcohol-induced asphyxia in the novel’s unforgettable final scene, as cunning in its deployment of silence and depictions of desolation as anything in The Plain In Flames or Pedro Páramo. The novel closes with Bernarda, their child, left to wander the cockfighting circuit in a self-imposed exile, singing the same songs as her mother, searching for solace she will likely never find. This is, after all, Rulfo’s Mexico, where neither justice nor peace come easy, if at all.         

Deep Vellum.