SILENT STONES, SELECTED POEMS OF MELIH CEVDET ANDAY

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SILENT STONES, SELECTED POEMS OF MELIH CEVDET ANDAY, TRANSLATED BY SIDNEY WADE AND EFE MURAD

Poet Sidney Wade, working with translator Efe Murad, received the 2015 Meral Divitci Prize for Turkish Poetry in Translation for Silent Stones, Selected Poems of Melih Cevdet Anday. The poetry selected for translation here seems to aim for what is often seen as the historical legacy of Turkish culture: to serve as a bridge between East and West. The translators dedicate the largest portion of this collection—some 70 pages—to Anday's colloquial and meditative free verse, easily accessible to readers of contemporary Western poetry and deftly translated by a poet whose particular voice seems almost too pronounced. While certain moments shine, particularly in the translators' ear for sound: “Hallucinatory rites bubble red-hot / On the sea, and the sun-rain glints," the real strength of this collection emerges in Anday's homage to the formal elegance of Turkish folk poetry and early Eastern poetics. When Anday writes of being "scattered like barleycorns on the road," readers familiar with pre-Islamic Arabic poetry will immediately recall Imru'l-Qays' line about the delicate beauty of a gazelle's dung "scattered like peppercorns" on the desert path. Later, in "A Poem in the Manner of Karacaoğlan," Anday draws upon the Eastern poetics of celestial bodies to describe a lost lover: "There were seven kinds of flowers in her hair / I saw the morning star, I saw the Pleiades." At such a critical moment in U.S. and world history, these poems offer "the sound of an historical wrist, of resistance" to those "deaf as a diamond.”

Talisman House, Publishers.