SEEING PEOPLE OFF

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SEEING PEOPLE OFF, BY JANA BENOVÁ, TRANSLATED BY JANET LIVINGSTONE

Seeing People Off is the story of a town, its inhabitants, and the way time ceases to exist for them. Or perhaps it’s the story of a couple, or how art gets made—or doesn’t. Like a wheel, Jana Beňová’s novel rotates, turning on its head in a melange of voices that meander through the strange and sometimes suffocating neighborhood of Petržalka. But to say that Beňová’s prose (as translated by Janet Livingstone) meanders is inaccurate; it’s more that it bounces through a fragmented narrative in ways that are both unexpected and beautifully resonant. The many moments of profound sadness are wisely cut by a sardonic underbite that keeps the writing sharp, fresh, constantly renewed.

At the book’s core is young couple Ian and Elza, working to produce art as they navigate consumer culture, identity, obsession, and post-socialist life in Bratislava. Though their story often feels fractured and lonely, Beňová is, in the end, more interested in the ways the characters are connected, acting as fragments of a single consciousness. She is particularly skilled at exploring how our bodies can move and break down together. “Their bodies fused to the midpoint,” she says in describing Ian and Elza, “...blooming like the sepal of a flower...Slow and thick like blood. Like slim, graceful snakes. They danced passionately and wildly. They danced as if they were samping on something underground. Some lost image, a dead couple, each other.”

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