NOT ONE DAY

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NOT ONE DAY, BY ANNE GARRÉTA, TRANSLATED BY EMMA RAMADAN

As a concession to her readers and an attempt to perhaps better understand herself, Anne Garréta decided to dedicate a period of time every day to writing about a woman whom she has loved.

This informs the framework of Not One Day (an abbreviation of “Not one day without a woman”), in which Garréta recounts, alphabetically, anecdotes and peccadilloes about the women she’s known and loved, women who have frustrated and bored her and sometimes even loved her in return. Garréta is no stranger to the Continental penchant for intertextuality. Passionate trysts live comfortably next to meditations on Flaubert in the modern age, while throughout she places her life under the microscope and subjects herself to unflinching scrutiny.

This intense literary scrutiny is ultimately what drives Not One Day, for the project remains unfinished. Garréta holds the French desire for confessional novels and the literary subject in contempt and questions her reasons for writing these glimpses into her past in the first place. “Irony alone is damning,” she concludes, and this meta-cynicism allows her novella to transcend itself, for the reader cannot help but feel a deep empathy for Garréta, as she lays herself bare and then wonders at the point of it all. The ideal of the form remains even after the spirit has collapsed on itself.

Not One Day is a wonderfully written (and translated), erudite book that captures a mysterious emotion that hovers somewhere on the borders of nostalgia, melancholy, and longing.

Deep Vellum.