BEYOND THE RICE FIELDS

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BEYOND THE RICE FIELDS, BY NAIVO, TRANSLATED BY ALLISON M. CHARETTE

Beyond the Rice Fields, the first Malagasy novel to be translated into English, tells the story of Tsito, a slave boy, and Fara, his master’s daughter, as they grow up under the shadow of 19th-century colonialism. Their lives, both together and apart, deliver elements of a classic love story, yet beyond the couple’s whispered promises, Naivo’s unflinching realism leaves no room for such idealized tenderness. Tsito and Fara exist in a divided Madagascar, in which Western culture and Malagasy tradition each seek to maintain a foothold among the people. As a new sovereign enacts violent measures to quell the growing threat of Christianity, the country is thrown into chaos — entire families are brought to trial, clans are massacred, and suspicion is everywhere. In its emotionally detached renderings of industrialization and its honest portrayal of individuals watching helplessly as their country turns against itself, the book is as much a commentary on the ruthlessness of colonial-era indifference as it is a primer in the universality of the human experience. And as the characters fall victim to the indiscriminate paranoia that fuels national politics, hope and despair rise and fall like a sine wave, pulled from its axis by the force of competing faiths. In Beyond the Rice Fields, the turn of each page is the flip of a playing card; as the conflict builds, Tsito and Fara’s fate becomes increasingly more precarious, and we find ourselves praying alongside those standing trial: “We ask that the outcome be favorable. We ask that the verdict be just.”

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